Mutant vs Variant

Here in Germany, the modified SARS-COV2 viruses, such as the „British mutation“ B.1.1.7. are often referred to as „mutants“. This is then often translated into English as „mutant“ or „mutation“ by German speakers.

But this is an incorrect interpretation. The terms „mutant“ and „mutation“ do exist in English, but the new, naturally changed viruses are called „variants“ in English, not „mutants“.

Referring to the virus as a „mutant“ to an English speaker is guaranteed to have a very disconcerting effect, so that is something that German speakers should be aware of.

Hier in Deutschland werden die, auf natürliche Weise, veränderten SARS-COV2 Viren, wie z.B. die „Britische Mutation“ B.1.1.7. häufig als „Mutanten“ bezeichnet. Das wird dann im Englischen gerne als „mutant“ oder „mutation“ bezeichnet.

Das ist aber eine falsche Interpretation. Es gibt zwar die Bezeichungen „mutant“ bzw. „mutation“ im Englischen, aber die neuen, veränderten Viren werden auf Englisch als „variants“, nicht als „mutants“ bezeichnet.

Das Virus einem englischsprechenden Menschen gegenüber als „Mutant“ zu bezeichnen, wird garantiert eine sehr befremdliche Wirkung haben.

Mutant: „an organism that is different from others of its type because of a permanent change in its genes.“ (Cambridge Dictionary)

• „These mutant lack a vital protein which gives them immunity to the disease.
• An unpleasant or frightening thing: The result of these experiments will be a nightmarish world filled with two-headed monsters and other mutants.
• Humorous: I’m convinced he’s a mutant – he’s not at all like the rest of the family!“

Variant: „something that is slightly different from other similar things.

• „There are many colas on the market now, all variants on the original drink.
• There are four variants of malaria, all transmitted to humans by a particular family of mosquitoes.“

Quelle: Cambridge Dictionary